Reverb

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electronicsolutions
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Reverb

Post by electronicsolutions » Mon Oct 04, 2004 6:18 pm

Back in the 60s I played guitar in a band. I guess we all did, lol. I had a reverb in my amp and I also bought one for my car. I remember there was a spring inside the unit but have no idea what the rest of it was.
I am building a vacume tube amplifier for my son, he saw one at the music store and was really impressed with it. I told him that was yesteryear technoligy and then taking a good close look at it, I realized they really upgraded these tube amps with some impressive hi tech. I should have known. lol.
Anyway, I am looking for a schamatic or as much information as I can get about the reverb unit. I want to add it to the tube amplifier.
I would appreciate anyone with any information at all.
Thank you
Mark

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Externet
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Re: Reverb

Post by Externet » Mon Oct 04, 2004 7:36 pm

Hi Mark.
A reverb unit was manufactured at my workplace among other devices many years ago; the schematic is kept archived here:<p>ftp://ftp.orban.com<p>Clic on 111B folder and enjoy.
Miguel :)
- Abolish the deciBel ! -

Enzo
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Re: Reverb

Post by Enzo » Mon Oct 04, 2004 9:40 pm

So many places to send you. Get out your Google.<p>Accutronics is the main maker of reverb pans these days. Beltron also makes them. You can find out lots from the Accu. site. A good place to buy one is from Antique Electronic Supply, visit them at www.tubesandmore.com. Their catalog is full of amp building stuff. Order the paper catalog - far easier to browse the shelves than online.<p>You can build a stand alone reverb that goes in front of the amp. Go to Mr.Gearhead and download the schematic for the Fender Tube Reverb.<p>Adding a reverb to an existing tube amp is not hard. More than I can explain in a post, but conceptually not hard. Coming out of the preamp, we sample the signal to the reverb pan driver, then the output of the reverb is mixed back in. The send and return can be taken at essentially the same poin with a high value rsistotr in series. Other useful smaple schematics can also be had at Mr.Gearhead. Fender Priceton Reverb would be a nice one. Or any amp with reverb in the name. Fender is a good brand to copy from, Very popular, many models, a real common amp line for home builders to emulate.<p>Visit [url=http://www.ampage.org,]www.ampage.org,[/url] a site devoted to amp builders - and modifyers. And the links alone there are worth the trip. If you have not finalized your design, then all the more reason to go. There is support there for anything from reworking an existing amp to building a kit, partial kit to building from scratch.<p>Quit telling that kid that the tubes are obsolete. They are not the thing to use for making computers or TVs or whatever, but they are the only thing out there that sounds like a tube amp when you are playing guitar through it. That is a long discussion in itself.

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Edd
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Re: Reverb

Post by Edd » Tue Oct 05, 2004 2:25 am

I will just preface this with the fact that I copied only the initial post off to laptop and was going to poke it up later..but I see that there have been two comebacks in the interim.<p>Seems like the late 50’s I started hearing of the utilization of ‘spring sets’ pulled from Hammond organs initially working their way into hi fi, stereos and guitar amps. By mid ‘60s I certainly had heard commercial Motorola and Zenith console stereos using them, as well as the ole “Fender Bender” amps. Quite impressive in the extra presence introduced to the music when that feature was quickly switched in /out to enact a comparison. The manufacturers tended to make the units adjustment range of the spring drive and the resultant injected echo just below that threshold where there would be no ‘sprang clang’…. Excepting, possibly, just after some rough percussive passages in music.
This URL data I had on file on the history of the initial units and their spin offs:
http://www.accutronicsreverb.com/history.htm <p>Enzo seems like both of your URLs mis referenced due to an errant comma and period suffixes,and took on the ID of a previously referenced site, but I did reference on in to find a photo of a spring unit :
http://www.tubesandmore.com/new/scripts ... EVERBTANKS if this units long tail still refreshes OK
Probably the top right set of dual springs was what you were using back in olden times.<p>I still have one set of springs that had (2)12AX7 tubes built onboard for interfacing.
Also, an old Automatic Radio Reverb…..Echomate I and II add on that was for automotive application.It used 2 transistors in its transducer coil pick up circuitry, while the auto radio’s attenuated speaker drive activated the spring driver coil.
Recently, I pulled one new Japanese spring set from an AKAI audio mixer console that is hardly half the length of those old units.
That referenced unit of Externets was a bit abnormal in respect of its design using something like a fet/bipolar Tl072 and a 381 amp in the spring driver and pick up post amp stages, but utilizing an old design UL709 in the frontal stage…this even being in 1986…..possibly they may have had a s---pot of NOS units on hand that they wanted to use up.<p>73's de Edd
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viveguy
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Re: Reverb

Post by viveguy » Tue Oct 05, 2004 3:22 am

Edd,
Spring reverbs are quite common in new gear. They are available in 3 lengths and a number of different I/O impedences. You can get new ones at Mojo tone (www.mojotone.com) or Antique Electronic Supply. They are fairly cheap, typically under $30.00.<p>Input impedences usually range from 8 ohms to a few hundred. They can be driven from an opamp or a 12AX7. Output impedences start at about 1K and range up to 20K or so. Again, you can use an opamp or a 12AT7.<p>You can go to the Ampage bulletin board for links to schematics or http://www.mrgearhead.com/ which is Fender's official website. They have a schematic download area there.

viveguy
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Re: Reverb

Post by viveguy » Tue Oct 05, 2004 8:45 am

Apologies to Edd for my previous post,I addressed the wrong person. I had an attack of 'old timers'. Sorry.

Enzo
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Re: Reverb

Post by Enzo » Tue Oct 05, 2004 7:19 pm

In the future I will make sure to leave a space after the URLs before sentence punctuation.<p>Bottom line is that reverb is quite current and readily available. Ther are literally thousands of models of guitar amp using spring reverb.

electronicsolutions
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Re: Reverb

Post by electronicsolutions » Thu Oct 07, 2004 4:53 pm

Reverb information: Thank you, I did not expect so much help and information from so many people. That was great!
Mark

Enzo
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Re: Reverb

Post by Enzo » Thu Oct 07, 2004 6:01 pm

What part of Michigan are you in? My shop is in Lansing.

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