Relay connection nomenclature

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Dean Huster
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Relay connection nomenclature

Post by Dean Huster » Wed Feb 06, 2008 9:29 pm

Industrial relays, in addition to pin numbers, also have function designations for their terminals. for instance:

A1, A2 = coil connections
11 = pole #1 common
12 = pole #1 N/C contact
14 = pole #1 N/O contact
21 = pole #2 common
22 = pole #2 N/C contact
24 = pole #2 N/O contact
31 = pole #3 common

and so forth.

After spending an hour on Google and a few other spots, can anyone pop up with an authorative Web site that provides the various designations for these connections? For instance, the above was put together just by common sense, but what does the "A" in A1 and A2 mean? Is there a "B", etc. Are there "numbers" other than 11, 12 and 14 for a pole? Please don't provide a lesson here ... I need something "official", such as from Allen-Bradley, Siemens, ANSI or whatever.

Thanks in advance.

Dean
Dean Huster, Electronics Curmudgeon
Contributing Editor emeritus, "Q & A", of the former "Poptronics" magazine (formerly "Popular Electronics" and "Electronics Now" magazines).

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rshayes
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Post by rshayes » Thu Feb 07, 2008 4:15 am

Hello Dean,

The Leach web site (www.leachintl.com) has the Leach catalog. The 065D relay uses the following designations:

X1, X2=Coil Connections
A1=pole #1 NO
A2=pole #1 COM
A3=pole #1 NC
B1=pole #2 NO
B2=pole #2 COM
B3=pole #2 NC

The KD relay uses these designations:

X1, X2=Coil Connections
A1=pole #1 NO
A2=pole #1 COM
B1=pole #2 NO
B2=pole #2 COM
C1=pole #3 NO
C2=pole #3 COM
11=auxillary pole NO
12=auxillary pole COM
13=auxillary pole NC

As you can see, the logic in the designation system is similar, but the actual designations are slightly different, with primary contacts identified by letter and auxillary contacts by number.

It would appear that each manufacturer does their own thing, but some systems may be similar.

rshayes

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Externet
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Post by Externet » Thu Feb 07, 2008 7:47 am

Hi.
And automotive relays/circuit nodes have a distinctive numbering, like the 85, 87, 88, 30, 15 on post #2 here:

http://www.mp3car.com/vbulletin/hardwar ... ams-2.html

Which I have never been able to find information about. Does anyone know?

Miguel
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Dean Huster
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Post by Dean Huster » Thu Feb 07, 2008 3:43 pm

Yeah, I knew that automotive relays had standard numbering within their industry and that it didn't overlap industrial electrical products. Also, I forget to check that "12" was definitely N/C vs. N/O. Too lazy to check now and it really doesn't matter.

Dean
Dean Huster, Electronics Curmudgeon
Contributing Editor emeritus, "Q & A", of the former "Poptronics" magazine (formerly "Popular Electronics" and "Electronics Now" magazines).

R.I.P.

sparkle
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Post by sparkle » Fri Feb 08, 2008 11:38 am

Externet wrote:Hi.
And automotive relays/circuit nodes have a distinctive numbering, like the 85, 87, 88, 30, 15 on post #2 here:

http://www.mp3car.com/vbulletin/hardwar ... ams-2.html

Which I have never been able to find information about. Does anyone know?

Miguel
DIN standard 72 552 for European cars...
http://www.motor.com/magazine/pdfs/042003_07.pdf

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Externet
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Post by Externet » Fri Feb 08, 2008 12:49 pm

Thanks for shining light into it, sparkle.

And what a dissappointment ! :sad: , I thought this would have some clever anything into it, but naming the relay pins 85, 30, 87, etc... shows no reason at all, is not a bit better than C; N.C. ; N.O.
The circuit nodes are pure arbitrary figures with nothing intrinsic that helps identifying. Just more sht to memorize. :mad:

Naming 30 to battery which could be B+ and 31 to ground (instead of gnd)... what an arbitrary stupidity. I can make my own DIN that way too :evil:
Miguel
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dyarker
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Post by dyarker » Fri Feb 08, 2008 1:17 pm

Sounds like you don't like N.O. (normally open), N.C. (normally closed), or C (common), where normal is no power applied to the coil???
Dale Y

sparkle
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Re: Relay connection nomenclature

Post by sparkle » Fri Feb 08, 2008 2:21 pm

Dean Huster wrote:Industrial relays, in addition to pin numbers, also have function designations for their terminals... I need something "official"...
Dean
http://www.labplan.ufsc.br/congressos/T ... 06_398.pdf

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Externet
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Post by Externet » Fri Feb 08, 2008 2:43 pm

Hello Dale.
To the contrary, I do prefer NC NO C and happy with them as they are a label and they are self explanatory. :smile:
I just expected a clever something DIN and there is nothing...
Miguel
- Abolish the deciBel ! -

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