European Espresso maker installed and wired for US use

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veradusit
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Post by veradusit » Mon Jan 21, 2008 2:27 pm

I will try it tonight

Droidwerkz
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Post by Droidwerkz » Fri Jan 25, 2008 3:15 am

i have to disagree about this "two phase" thing for an electric dryer...220 really is a single phase, the sinewave is split in half by the nuetral , and "two phase" only applies when you have a 220 , and a 110 tap. but then it is using a split phase tap which means that the appliances 220 components are running on the full phase, where as the 110 components are running on 1/2 the voltage 1/2 the phase as the 220 components. it's split phase not "two phase"..


anyway for your cofee pot


-------phase A--------goes to "hot" side of coffee pot-----

GND---------------Goes to ground lead of coffee pot--

-------phase B--------goes to "nuetral" side of cofee pot--

remember that voltage is actually electrical differential .....if you could think of your fusebox like this you have one side that is +110 volts and because it is alternating phase the other at the same time is -110 volts and vice versa.
Image

Bear
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Post by Bear » Fri Jan 25, 2008 4:58 pm

True 2-phase electricity requires that the neutral be twice as big as either one of the other conductors.
I was always taught that the european wire code used BlUe/PUrple as the neutral wire as it is usually the only other color that has a "U" in it as our ne"U"tral does.

Bear

dyarker
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Post by dyarker » Sat Feb 02, 2008 9:52 am

"True 2-phase electricity requires that the neutral be twice as big as either one of the other conductors."

Why would that be? Worst case would be max current on one phase and zero current on other. When currents in both phases are equal, then neutral current is zero.
Dale Y

Bigglez
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Post by Bigglez » Sat Feb 02, 2008 10:19 am

Greetings Bear,
dyarker wrote:"True 2-phase electricity requires that the neutral be twice as big as either one of the other conductors."

Why would that be? Worst case would be max current on one phase and zero current on other. When currents in both phases are equal, then neutral current is zero.
You are correct when the two phases are 180 degrees apart,
which is the case for "split-phase" 120/240V service in North
America.

Perhaps the comment was directed at two phases of a three-phase
supply, where the phases are 120 degrees apart, or an
arcane two-phase systemwith 90 degrees between phases?

Comments Welcome!

Bear
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Post by Bear » Sun Feb 03, 2008 9:15 am

Peter... Yes I was refering to the arcane(?) system. Thank you for digging up that explanation of "2 phase" electricity. I was wondering how I was going to explain it. Arcane ? maybe. Up until some years ago there was a machine/metal fab shop in Oakland, CA that used motors that spun the shafts with the pulleys on it that fed the belts that powered the machines.
Walking into Jerry's shop was walking back into the late 19th./early 20th. century.

Take care all!!

Dennis

rshayes
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Post by rshayes » Sun Feb 03, 2008 8:45 pm

Conversion between 2 phase and 3 phase power can be done with a transformer connection called a "Scott T". I suspect that most power distribution was done with 3 phase power, and that individual users would convert it to 2 phase power if it was needed.

I have seen several reprints of books on lathe operation published around 1940 that still showed lathes using belt drive from overhead shafts. Some of the lathes were powered by individual motors mounted behind the lathe, but still with a belt drive. I would guess that a machine shop established before 1940 would have continued to use the old equipment for several years after because of the scarcity of new equipment in World War II and the money invested in the tools already bought.

Bigglez
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Post by Bigglez » Mon Feb 04, 2008 4:31 pm

Greetings Dennis,
Bear wrote:Up until some years ago there was a machine/metal fab shop in Oakland, CA that used motors that spun the shafts with the pulleys on it that fed the belts that powered the machines.
Walking into Jerry's shop was walking back into the late 19th./early 20th. century.
I didn't realize the Bay Area had anything that old and still
in place. Actually, now I think about it Livermore has the
Centennial Light. More info here.

A good place to see overhead belts and pulleys is in the
Machine Shop at the Empire Mine in Grass Valley, Ca. More info here.

Also of interest is the first long distance high voltage
power lines that served the silver mining town of Bodie, Ca.
(Now a ghost town preserved in a state of arrested decay).

Comments Welcome!

Robert Reed
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Post by Robert Reed » Mon Feb 04, 2008 8:37 pm

I'm into woodworking and do a lot of bussiness with a nearby Amish Mill shop. Talk about stepping into the past, this place is exactly that. One deisel engine ( maybe a 100 + H.P.) located in an attached building drives a huge under the floor shaft that runs the length of the building. along its length are PTO belts that drive sub shafts and then belts at right angles thru the floor to power machinery engaged with a manual clutch. The machines are massive compared to todays comparable models. The entire shop is lit with Coleman type lanterns and------the work they turn out is absolutely PRIMO!

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