DSP ADVICE

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Turbo46
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DSP ADVICE

Post by Turbo46 » Mon Apr 18, 2005 12:03 pm

Hi <p>In a few months, I have the option to study DSP as a final year option
at uni. I dont know the subject yet, but is my time better spent else
were? I there lots of jobs in this area of industry? Is it worth me
having numerous sleepless nights studying this area?<p>
Lastly when in industry, are all the calculations generally worked out
in Matlab?

Look forward to your advice

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haklesup
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Re: DSP ADVICE

Post by haklesup » Mon Apr 18, 2005 1:11 pm

The answer will come only from you. It depends largely on what part of engineering is attractive to you and what you see yourself doing after graduation.<p>I may have taken it if it was available when I was in school. As it turned out, it took 10 years at the same job before I started actually designing anything.<p>Make sure to get programming skills while still in school. EEs with solid background in C programming are at the top of the pay scale and get the best design jobs.<p>DSP is essentially the future of Analog applications. Most things that used to be controlled by Analog circuits can be digitized and manipultated in a processor. This would be a good cross mix of analog, digital, processor design and writing firmware. These chips are extremely versitile and will be found in more and more products as time goes by. It is at the heart of many communications systems as well (HDTV)<p>If you want to work in circuit design, chip layout or design or system level design using this technology then having this knowledge would be quite useful. If you want to work in a manufacturing related job where they make this technology this would be somewhat useful.<p>If you want to do just about anything else, this might not be useful. A career path is mostly determined by the jobs you can get not the ones you want to get (unless you are in the top 1% of your class then recruiters will beg at your door). Much of what you use will be learned on the job but not all.<p>Many engineers do not do hand calculations except to make approximations. In most cases application specific CAD programs will generally do any computation for you. The person who ends up needing to know the formula the most is the software engineer who wrote the program.

peter-f
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Re: DSP ADVICE

Post by peter-f » Tue Apr 19, 2005 6:46 am

You need to keep in mind... industies change... these days RAPIDLY!<p>In my early 50's, I've seen 4 careers already... not in the 'tight' definition of engineering. <p>I also know of at least 3 'indispensible' careers that have evaporated! (anyone remember Keypunch Operators?) And several more that are so radically different they can only support 10-30% of their former population.<p>The answer today is for today... tommorrow will surprise you! <p>Guaranteed!

ezpcb
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Re: DSP ADVICE

Post by ezpcb » Wed Apr 20, 2005 12:01 am

Only you can answer your questions correctly. But I'm very interested in DSP, both algrothm and hardware designing. I'm using Analog Device's Blackfin to build my digital radio reciever. matlab is enough for software simulation, but hardware and DSP programming is quite a different area. Keep on going and enjoy it.<p>mike
http://www.EzPCB.com
High Quality PCB for Electronics Hobbists, Pay for Chrokee, Get Land Rover

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Sambuchi
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Re: DSP ADVICE

Post by Sambuchi » Thu Apr 21, 2005 7:47 am

I would recommend studying DSP's.. I agree with all of the posts before me. DSP's are very powerful and can handle complex calculations. A most DSP's are programmed in Assembly for fast data conversion. I've seen DSP's used in..<p>Motor control where high precision is required.. etc. medical tools.
Analog sensors.. etc. Accelerometer.
http://www.unf.edu/%7Esama0004/Projects ... _index.htm
(A project I have done with a DSP)<p>Filters, Video Processing and much more..<p>You also asked where Matlab is used in industry. I am using it right now with a PLD. I am doing a video application and the PLD from Xilinx can be programmed with MatLab along with some other programs.<p>I had good luck with using DSP’s from TI.. check them out.. samples are free. And I just started using the Blackfin.. I hope for the same results!
Good Luck

Turbo46
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Re: DSP ADVICE

Post by Turbo46 » Fri Apr 22, 2005 6:39 am

Hi<p>Sorry for the delay to your answers, I have been out of the country. <p>Prior to uni I spent 10 years as a mechanic in the car industry. I went to uni to learn electronics and hopfully move into either car or motorcycle performance electronics. These including electronic turbo controllers, ecu's, electronic differential etc etc.<p>By reading your replies you have given me that extra bit of confidence, and insight and I think I will will take the final year option.<p>Thanks agian.<p>Turbo

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