Power Connection to PCB

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TLump
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Power Connection to PCB

Post by TLump » Mon Mar 05, 2007 8:38 pm

I need to attach a bus bar to a PCB. The attachment point needs to be approximately .125 inch above the surface of the PCB. I placed a PEM fastener "swaged" into the PCB and attached the bus bar to an 1/8 inch high by .38 round standoff soldered to the PCB to transfer approximately 60 Amps.
The problem is the swaged PEM fastener will sometimes destroy the trace due to the deformation of the PCB.
Does anyone have an alternate method. I am really cramp for space. (':x')
Mad.

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Chris Smith
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Post by Chris Smith » Tue Mar 06, 2007 10:52 am

If heat is the issue start here...Other companies do make them smaller.

http://www.stormcopper.com/Glastic-Stan ... lators.htm

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Dave Dixon
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Post by Dave Dixon » Tue Mar 06, 2007 11:04 am

I'm not sure if this an option or not... In the past, I have taken such a standoff and only lightly crimped it to the PCB - Just enough to make a fairly decent physical connection - without causing damage to the PCB, and then soldered the heck out of it. This goes against all of the rules. Solder isn't supposed to be relied on for a physical connection, only an electrical one. I have used this method in the past though. Best of luck,
Dave

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Bob Scott
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Post by Bob Scott » Tue Mar 06, 2007 2:35 pm

Dave Dixon wrote:Solder isn't supposed to be relied on for a physical connection, only an electrical one.
I remember my Dad telling me the same thing, that you MUST make a good mechanical connection before soldering. But that was before surface mount technology...flea size parts so low in mass that don't need added mechanical restraint.

Bob

TLump
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Thanks

Post by TLump » Mon Mar 12, 2007 8:56 pm

Great inputs and nice web site! I still got some research to do but kicking it around always helps.
:razz:

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