USB Coin-op accepter

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Newz2000
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USB Coin-op accepter

Post by Newz2000 » Fri Nov 03, 2006 7:45 am

I've been searching, but based on the pitiful number of results I must not be searching for the right thing. Certainly these have to exist...

I'd like to make a device that when you put a quarter in it it signals a computer via USB, or even serial, or even just registers a positive click on some switch that I can read from a PIC.

Does anyone know a low-cost vendor or at least a useful search phrase?

JPKNHTP
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Post by JPKNHTP » Fri Nov 03, 2006 8:17 am

-JPKNHTP
-God Bless


Newz2000
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Post by Newz2000 » Fri Nov 03, 2006 11:22 am

Thanks, that's remarkable that they're so inexpensive. And what's the story with so many of those sites saying, "call or e-mail for pricing?" Are they afraid of people seeing their prices and leaving the site?

I'm going to contact the company for details, but this one, http://www.happcontrols.com/coindoors/40002300p.htm looks like a win for $24.50.

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GoingFastTurningLeft
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Post by GoingFastTurningLeft » Fri Nov 03, 2006 1:40 pm

Happ Controls has been around a while, if you need anything arcade related they're usually pretty good.

If you ever wanted to build an PC MAME (Multiple arcade machine emulator) arcade cabinet, they're a good source of parts.

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techie2
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Post by techie2 » Sat Nov 04, 2006 9:52 am

NewZ2000,

I worked in the coin-op industry for a while.
Happ Controls is indeed a good company. Here's another, a link to Competitive Products, showing a coin mech. Notice that these things can take US quarters OR tokens. You would not want the one for tokens...

http://www.competitiveproducts.com/coinacceptor.htm

These coin mechs are not user friendly as far as mounting goes. They need an assembly to slide into. This makes it very easy for coin-op repair technicians to change them out quickly, even on route if they have one acting up.. Normally all they need is a good cleaning, but time is money... Clean it later at the shop. I believe that the coin switch (microswitch)is also mounted onto the bracket assembly just below the coin mech...

I have a suggestion.
The owner/operator where I worked always had a lot of old junked coin doors in the storage area of his building. Old video games (at least before they became collector's items) used to get junked out. The mechanics would save lots of spare parts. The guys "stripping" the games didn't know what the technicians needed, so they save junk as well as good stuff.

They end up with (literally) piles of coin doors, old linear power supplies, game boards, etc.
The cabinets would be destroyed. It takes up a lot of space to store this type of equipment, and if it doesn't make money, it goes to auction, "classics" sell on Ebay, or it gets junked. The determining factor is the condition the perceived value of the game.

If you do a search through your local yellow pages, paper or online, you'll probably find arcade games, or search for "amusement devices". I like to use "switchboard.com"...

Call them and ask if they might have an old coin door with the coin mech. & coin switch as a unit that they will sell at a good price. Let them know its ok if the door is bent or scratched. (Thieves try to break in and steal money. In doing so, they bend up the coin door.)

What you want is the hardware to mount the coin mech., the coin mech. itself, and the microswitch. You will probably cut the door down to a smaller size. Look at any video game at your local Wal*Mart or Arcade and you will see the coin door on the front of the game.

The coin mech. just slips into the bracket and is held by a spring or maybe a screw. It's been awhile. The microswitch attaches very easily to the bracket at the bottom of the coin mech.

When a quarter is dropped in the coin mech. it slides past a magnet that would catch a slug. Dimes, pennies and nickels would fall through and hit the return slot. The quarter finds it's way on through and drops out the bottom into the coin box. As it falls out it hits the microswitch and most have a normally open, and normally closed single pole contacts. So you have your choice.

With a little debounce routine and a good setup like this, you should be all set...

Good luck

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