PIC Programmer for Linux Laptop

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Do you use Linux?

All the time
3
25%
Sometimes
3
25%
I've tried it
2
17%
No, haven't tried it yet
4
33%
No, and I never will
0
No votes
 
Total votes: 12

Newz2000
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PIC Programmer for Linux Laptop

Post by Newz2000 » Sun Jun 04, 2006 12:01 pm

While trying to get this USB circuit working I realized that my JDM programmer doesn't work on my laptop. I have a USB to serial adapter and I get nothing. Normally, I like the smaller pics so use my USB PICKit1 programmer which works awesome.

I'm thinking I'll need a new programmer. When I make a new purchase I'll need to ensure it works on a laptop (preferably through USB) and also can work under Linux. I really don't want to spend much money ($80 or less, and ideally, much less). Also, much lower priority, but it would also be cool if it not only supported in-circuit programming but also had a socket.

Does anyone know of a programmer that will definately work with a laptop and ideally is also supported under linux?

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philba
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Post by philba » Sun Jun 04, 2006 1:01 pm

The best programmer is the ICD2 or a clone. Sparkfun sell the OLIMEX clone for $100. You can build you own for less than $20. http://www.stolz.de.be/ Because MPLAB drives the programmer, it is gaurrenteed to support the most devices.

I've not heard of a linux basedprogrammer that drives the ICD2. MPLAB might run under a windows emulator, though.

copperclad
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Post by copperclad » Sun Jun 04, 2006 1:30 pm

hi
i just got a olimex ( pic-mcp-usb ) programmer from sparkfun for $87.00
http://www.sparkfun.com/commerce/produc ... ducts_id=4

i thought it was a good setup as it doesn't need an external power supply and it comes with the ZIF socket

the usb it has is a built in usb-serial , don't know about it working with linux or not , but i know it works well with windows XP , dana :smile:

Mike
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Post by Mike » Wed Jun 07, 2006 7:09 pm

I absolutely love linux. For those who haven't tried it or who have tried it and didnt like it, you have to try ubuntu's new dapper drake release. It's amazing.

I can't wait until I figure out how to get XGL to work. Vista-like graphics for free! Transparancy, 3D desktop, etc. I have to admit right now it's not easy to get XGL installed but I can't wait to figure it out.

They even will ship you 100% free cds including a live CD which you can boot from. Just go to shipit.ubuntu.com.

Anyway, have you tried running the software you use on windows on linux through wine?

edit: I was just looking through that site and this programmer looks really nice and easy: http://home.vrweb.de/~lotharstolz/stolz ... index.html

Will it work with the 16F84? If so I'm not even going to attempt to buld a JDM

Newz2000
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Post by Newz2000 » Wed Jun 07, 2006 8:29 pm

I just got hired by Canonical to be the new webmaster for the Ubuntu (and other canonical) websites. I start July 3rd. As a matter of fact, I've got to order a new laptop and I'm trying to decide on one now. ;-)

I guess that means that Ubuntu is my favorite Linux distro too! (actually, it's been my favorite since I tried it, about 18 months ago)

XGL is a pain, but I've gotten it working on two computers now. What video card do you have? I can send you some instructions. But a warning - for me, it wasn't stable enough for regular use. That could be because my current computer's video card (Intel GMA 950) is too new, but it's equally likely that XGL is too new as well. I'm excited about seeing it mature and definately hope it's more prominant in the next release.

BTW, I've tried building a JDM and it's not worth it. You can get one for $12 at sparkfun.

I'll try the software I have now, but I'm not happy with it... I use the IC Prog software mentioned in that link and even though it supports my programmer (on a regular desktop pc, not a laptop) it doesn't support the newest USB Pic chips. My PicKit1 is supported under both Windows and Linux but it only programs the small < 20 pin chips. I had to whip out my JDM to try and program the 28 pin 18F2455 and found I was up a creek on two fronts.

Mike
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Post by Mike » Thu Jun 08, 2006 4:54 am

I have had all the parts for a JDM for a while now, just never got around to building it. However, now I'm trying to build a digitally controlled power supply, so I want PIC controlled digital resistors to control the variable regulators.

So now I'd really like to build a programmer. I should just stick with the JDM then?

About XGL I have an ATI Radeon 9600XT. I really wish I had an nvidia but I got such a great deal on this (bought a 9600SE on sale for $39 and it never worked so ATI replaced it for the 9600XT for free) that I seen no reason to waste any more money just to have an nvidia card. I know for the nvidia cards there is already a downloadable script you can use.

I'm really new to linux, I'm catching on pretty quickly though, but I'm not comfortable enough with all the steps I've found on various websites. I wish you could just use synaptic to download a package. Now that would be easy!

But either way, if it's not too stable then I don't think I'm going to bother with it just yet.

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dr_when
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Post by dr_when » Thu Jun 08, 2006 5:57 am

Ubuntu Dapper Drake Rocks!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
"Who is John Galt?"

Mike
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Post by Mike » Thu Jun 08, 2006 6:21 am

I like it so much! everything feels so XP-like, as in buttons are smooth, with a 3D effect, everything is now nearly as modern feeling as XP. You can even make the windows resemble XP. See the screenshot at the bottom.

I also love not having to have a firewall, virus scanner or spyware scanner.

And the thousands of free software apps you can install with a click from the internet through synaptic package manager.

There are a few things however holding linux back from mainstream use. It's suprisingly not as compatable as windows. You have to have certain pacakage types for different distributions (rpm or deb) and half of the time they aren't compatable. For example, a deb for debian may not work in place of a deb for ubuntu. Things like the alien program help a little when I need to install an rpm, but half the time that doesn't work either when it converts it since apps are distribution-specific. People complain about how proprietary windows is, yet many times no two linux distributions can run the same software! It would sure be nice to be able to double click a program and have it install like InstallShield on windows. In linux I have to go to a terminal, then type 'sudo dpkg -i filename'. A graphical install would be way nicer and make it so much easier for the average windows user.

Finally the sound system is not too good on linux. If a program uses it it gains exclusive control and no other program can access it. Actually it's really weird now that I think about it. Say I'm listening to music through rhythmbox and using GAIM to IM people. I can hear the music and the IM with no problems. But if I'm listening to music and go online to play a flash game, the flash has no sound. It's really weird and kind-of a pain.

Other than that ubuntu is excellent - but it's still no complete replacement for windows.

http://img228.imageshack.us/img228/2880 ... hot0lv.png

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