Creating Custom printed PC Boards

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JerryR
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Re: Creating Custom printed PC Boards

Post by JerryR » Fri Mar 14, 2003 7:20 am

found this term in reference to PC boards.
"Dry Mount Press" What is it?
TIA
JerryR
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Leon
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Re: Creating Custom printed PC Boards

Post by Leon » Sat Mar 29, 2003 2:09 pm

<blockquote><font size="1" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">quote:</font><hr>Originally posted by JerryR:
found this term in reference to PC boards.
"Dry Mount Press" What is it?
TIA
JerryR
<hr></blockquote><p>Used by photographers for mounting photographs onto card. Special 'dry-mount' film is placed between the photo and the card, they are pressed together and heated in the press. It also works quite well with toner transfer film.

Dean Huster
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Re: Creating Custom printed PC Boards

Post by Dean Huster » Sun Mar 30, 2003 5:29 am

Jerry, I think I was the culprit that used the "dry mount press" term.<p>A dry mount press consists of two flat platens, both heated to clothing iron temperatures. I use it to transfer the toner to the PCB. The press locks down to hold everything in place. You can vary the temperature and the pressure (how tight its squeezing things together, not barometric!). The nice thing about using it is that it will turn two of the clothing iron variables (temperature and pressure exerted) into constants. Time is the last variable and once you have it figured out for your particular setup, the process is fast and easy. The dry mount press also keeps even pressure and temperature over the entire surface of the PCB all at once.<p>With the one I used, I turned the temperature to its highest setting and would hold the PCB/pnp sandwich for about 2 minutes as I recall (it's been six years now since I had this ideal setup and my memory is fading). I used a 555 timer circuit for my timing cycle. A small boxer fan sat on a bare shelf where I could put the sandwich so that it would cool down faster. You ALWAYS want to be sure to cool a pnp sandwich to room temperature before peeling the film off or you'll pull some of the toner with it.<p>The press will end up being the highest-cost item in a toner transfer setup, so try to find one on ebay or used from a photographer or newspaper. But it's worth it.<p>Dean
Dean Huster, Electronics Curmudgeon
Contributing Editor emeritus, "Q & A", of the former "Poptronics" magazine (formerly "Popular Electronics" and "Electronics Now" magazines).

R.I.P.

JerryR
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Re: Creating Custom printed PC Boards

Post by JerryR » Sun Mar 30, 2003 8:32 am

To Dean and Leon, Thank you for the info.
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atpclogic
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Re: Creating Custom printed PC Boards

Post by atpclogic » Mon Mar 31, 2003 7:36 pm

Just as a precaution... Some people use coated inkjet paper and various other things (wall paper?) for use with toner-transfer type pcbs.... however, be careful about the temperature and be careful about possible jams. These papers are NOT formulated for use in laser printers and a problem can be very expensive to correct. Be especially careful if you 'make your own' toner transfer paper. :) <p>I would recommend buying your paper from one of the vendors, just because they have formulated the paper to handle the high temperatures encountered in a laser printer or copier.<p>Neat idea though to use glass plates and an oven.....<p>Regards,
Brad

greg123
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Re: Creating Custom printed PC Boards

Post by greg123 » Mon Mar 31, 2003 7:52 pm

I have printed on (laser jet) both photo paper and cotten paper from the dollar stores with the acid etch and they have worked very well.<p>g

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