ultrasonic cleaners

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Chuck Barker
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ultrasonic cleaners

Post by Chuck Barker » Sat Dec 22, 2001 5:38 pm

would appreciate any information on ultrasonic cleaners i.e. theory of operation, block diagrams, frequency used for small objects, and cleaning solutions that can be mixed at home.
thanks for your tiime and effort!!!

russlk
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Re: ultrasonic cleaners

Post by russlk » Sun Dec 23, 2001 6:35 am

Ultra-sonic cleaners usually use magnetostriction to produce compression waves (vibration) in the fluid, which can be any that is compatible with the part being cleaned, including water. Be advised that this process is not advised for cleaning electronic parts with ICs and transistors because the vibration can damage wire bonds.

rckbrwn
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Re: ultrasonic cleaners

Post by rckbrwn » Sun Dec 30, 2001 2:20 pm

A few years ago, popular electronics or radio electronics had a construction article for an ultrasonic cleaner. Heathkit made one also. You might be able to track down a manual reprint for it.<p>Rick

JdOwNj
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Re: ultrasonic cleaners

Post by JdOwNj » Mon Dec 31, 2001 5:44 pm

How usefull Are they? What are the practical uses?

Chuck Barker
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Re: ultrasonic cleaners

Post by Chuck Barker » Fri Jan 11, 2002 4:36 pm

<blockquote><font size="1" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">quote:</font><hr>Originally posted by JdOwNj:
How usefull Are they? What are the practical uses?<hr></blockquote><p>wanted to build a small one to clean watches and other small parts as this is the best way of doing so. a one quart size start around $200.
the frequency range seems to be 40khz to 60khz
chuck

Dean Huster
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Re: ultrasonic cleaners

Post by Dean Huster » Sat Jan 12, 2002 9:15 pm

Another wonderful use for an ultrasonic cleaner was to clean Rapidograph drafting pens that had dried out and were jammed up. Those are expensive pens with a half dozen pieces each. I have a nice set that got put in storage years ago with ink still in them. I could recoup the cost of building an ultrasonic cleaner or buying a small one just in putting those pens back into good repair!<p>Dean
Dean Huster, Electronics Curmudgeon
Contributing Editor emeritus, "Q & A", of the former "Poptronics" magazine (formerly "Popular Electronics" and "Electronics Now" magazines).

R.I.P.

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Chris Smith
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Re: ultrasonic cleaners

Post by Chris Smith » Sat Jan 12, 2002 9:58 pm

Dean.... Microwave "steam" them back to life!!! Been recovering printers and their INK delivery systems for more than 10 years. Call me!

Dean Huster
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Re: ultrasonic cleaners

Post by Dean Huster » Tue Jan 15, 2002 5:30 am

"Microwave steam", Chris? There's enough non-removable metal in the nibs that I'd expect them to go into meltdown ... or am I not seeing the full picture here?<p>Dean
Dean Huster, Electronics Curmudgeon
Contributing Editor emeritus, "Q & A", of the former "Poptronics" magazine (formerly "Popular Electronics" and "Electronics Now" magazines).

R.I.P.

Bygar
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Re: ultrasonic cleaners

Post by Bygar » Sat May 14, 2011 2:21 pm

RE; Ultrasonic cleaning. Those that I know of use about40KHz.
I own a Heathkit it is about 100 Watts and I beleive about 40 KHz.
Electronics Now issue of March 1993 published an article for construction
of a 3/4 gallon ultrasonic cleaner.
Both these units used piezoelectric transducers.
Somewhere in collection of information I have a copy of a publication
by Philips called Philigram detailing the use ferrxocube cores to build a 40 KHz
transducer and possibly a 40 Watt driver for same.
If I find the article I will advise. Article found, actually more than one.
Ferroxcube ultrasonic transducers. Here is a list of cores;
K5 550 00, K5 550 05, K5 550 10, K5 550 11, K5 550 15, K5 550 16, K5 550 21,
K6 100 00, K6176 00. There is more to the table and drawings.
The other is a schematic for a forty watt unit, some details are not given.
If you are interested, I would need your email address. I will do my best to
to assemble copies of the data.
Philigram was vintage of 60's.

Dean Huster
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Re: ultrasonic cleaners

Post by Dean Huster » Sun May 15, 2011 11:46 am

Hmmmm. Another ancient post has been resurrected.

The teletype shops at the Naval Stations where I served had huge ultrasonic tanks that they loaded up with about 10 gallons of solvent for cleaning TTY printers. A heck of a lot of oiling was required after that cleaning!
Dean Huster, Electronics Curmudgeon
Contributing Editor emeritus, "Q & A", of the former "Poptronics" magazine (formerly "Popular Electronics" and "Electronics Now" magazines).

R.I.P.

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jwax
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Re: ultrasonic cleaners

Post by jwax » Sun May 15, 2011 1:20 pm

Nice to hear your comments Bygar, but what's the point in bringing a 10 year-old thread back to life?
Just asking. :???:

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haklesup
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Re: ultrasonic cleaners

Post by haklesup » Tue May 17, 2011 3:01 am

Whatever you use it for, Do not use it to clean assemblies with relays on board. I cleaned 10 switch matrix cards one day and then spent the following week replacing 10% of the relays which were either now stuck open or closed or made a crazy buzzing noise when closed.

Piezo electric transducers are flat out the least expensive and efficient way of generating ultrasonic audio waves at very high volume as is required for US cleaners.

"Philgram" Is that like a 70s, 80s vintage app note. I suppose way back then peizo wasn't as mature as it is now and other transducer technologies may have still been competitive

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