mystery connector?

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jimandy
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mystery connector?

Post by jimandy » Mon Jun 27, 2005 11:32 am

Well probably no mystery to some of you old-timers.
In the pix
Image
its the audio connector used on a Shure a95u in-line transformer. Comprised of a threaded collar (ground) with the center conductor centered in the insulating disk The mating connector (the piece on the right) is supplied with a short cable that terminates with a mini-jack. I need another one of those cables and can jin it if I can find a source for the special connector. I bet it has a generic name (as in XLR, BNC, etc). to make it easier for my part search.
"if it's not another it's one thing."

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jwax
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Re: mystery connector?

Post by jwax » Mon Jun 27, 2005 12:24 pm


jimandy
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Re: mystery connector?

Post by jimandy » Mon Jun 27, 2005 1:06 pm

Aha! I think I've found it at...
http://www.angela.com/catalog/microphon ... hones.html<p>It's described only as a Switchcraft old-style audio connector. Now how's that for generic ?!
"if it's not another it's one thing."

upsmaster
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Re: mystery connector?

Post by upsmaster » Mon Jun 27, 2005 2:13 pm

its a high z mike connector for a high z mike useing coax wire standard on high z mikes..never though it would be hard to find.
joe

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Re: mystery connector?

Post by Gorgon » Mon Jun 27, 2005 3:18 pm

Hi Jimandy,
A bit late, but good I hope:
http://www.acksupply.com/catalog/connect1.pdf <p>Look at the last page (37).<p>TOK ;)
Gorgon the Caretaker - Character in a childrens TV-show from 1968. ;)

jimandy
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Re: mystery connector?

Post by jimandy » Mon Jun 27, 2005 3:50 pm

Good grief, Gorgon. I'm right here in Birmingham, the home of the original Ack Radio! I could have driven down there and shown 'em the connector! Thanks for finding it in their PDF.<p>Come to think of it, that connector, I believe, was used on a lot of the old ham radio microphones, and Ack was "ham headquarters" here for years.
"if it's not another it's one thing."

Enzo
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Re: mystery connector?

Post by Enzo » Mon Jun 27, 2005 7:57 pm

That is the old "standard microphone connector" abd it was widely used for that purpose as well as others. My old Eico VTVM uses one as the probe connection. You will find in on older gear where microphone inputs were made.<p>It is a Switchcraft 2501. Without the threaded ring it was male - 2501M. Add the ring and it becomes female - 2501F. The one for panel mounting was 2501MP. I have never seen a female on a panel,but a threaded ring would make it one.. Switchcraft 44 is an adaptor. 1/4" plug on one end, and the microphone male on the other. Screw one of the 44 adaptors into the female on the right in your photo and it can then be plugged into any 1/4" jack.<p>A friend works for a company that makes microphone preamps. I sent him a few of those connectors for fun. He went to the engineer and said he was having a hard time figuring ot how to wire in the mic connectors. Then he showed the guy the 2501. Oh what fun we have...

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Re: mystery connector?

Post by Dean Huster » Tue Jun 28, 2005 6:23 am

The most common name for this puppy is the "Amphenol microphone connector". The topic comes up frequently on the antique radios sites because it is used often on older service-grade test equipment such as VTVMs and signal generators. It was also the mic connector of choice for most ham radio transmitters of the era. Here's a blurb I wrote on the subject a couple of years ago that's got more than you want to know about the connector:<p>THE AMPHENOL MICROPHONE CONNECTOR<p>
There is a connector that was used quite a bit in the 1940s through the 1960s called the "Amphenol microphone connector." This connector was a screw-on type of coaxial connector popular for use on the high-impedance inputs of public address systems and for probe or output signal connections of service-grade test equipment such as VTVMs and signal generators. The test equipment built from kits (Knight Kit and EICO for example) especially used them. These connectors were also found as the microphone inputs for older amateur radio equipment.<p> The connector that is mounted on the equipment is a male thread and has a profile that's about 3/8" high and 5/8" in diameter. The threaded collar of the chassis-mounted connector connects directly to the chassis unless an insulated shoulder washer is used to isolate the mounting. The center conductor is an eyelet into which the signal line is soldered. <p> The cable end of the connector consists of a loose mounting collar that threads onto the chassis connector. This threaded portion of the connector connects to the shield of a shielded cable through a strain-relief spring and setscrew combination and the center conductor of the cable, the signal, solders to the center of the Amphenol connector, which like on the mating connector, is nothing more than a brass eyelet. When the cable end is threaded onto the chassis portion, the two solder blobs which are the center conductor connections, are pulled into contact.

The Amphenol microphone connector, supplied by Switchcraft has a 5/8-27 thread. You can find the data at http://www.switchcraft.com/products/connectors-53b.html. I've seen the connectors sold through both Mouser Electronics and Kelvin Electronics.<p> There are folks who think, and will defend to the death, the notion that the "UHF" connector that is popular with amateur radio antenna systems and CB antenna inputs have the same mating thread. Although both connectors have a 5/8-inch major diameter, the these two connectors do not have the same thread pitch. It's a little harder to find official thread information on the UHF connector. You can find this information if you go to the Pasternack Enterprises site:
http://www.pasternack.com/main.htm Once there, click the "Smart Catalog" oval. Next, for "Product Category", select "CONNECTORS". Then for "Type", select "UHF FEMALE". For "Mount", select "4-HOLE PANEL". Then "bullet" the selection for "Non-Cable". Then click on the "View Part" oval. Now click on the "Large View" oval. Presto!! Finally, after all these steps, you see the UHF connector, threads marked "0.625-24" (5/8" = 0.625").<p> So, the Amphenol connector has a 5/8-27 thread and the UHF connector has a 5/8-24 thread. 10-24 (3/16-24) is a very common machine screw thread. You can lay the threads of a 10-24 screw in the threads of a female UHF connector, and they snuggle right in there perfectly. Lay that same screw in the threads of a male Amphenol microphone connector and you'll see that it just isn't right. It may APPEAR to fit if you're dealing with the 2 or 3 threads of the female cable end of the connector. Those threads on that part of the connector serve no useful purpose other than to help retain the collar, just like the few threads on the end of the PL-259 UHF connector. And 2 or 3 threads isn't enough thread to verify close pitches. <p> The UHF connector WILL crossthread on an Amphenol connector. Those who say it won't are either using Asian imports for their connectors or are only mating three threads or less or both. Asian imports are often manufactured with sloppy thread tolerances. Believe me, the 24 tpi UHF connector will quickly crossthread and bind up against the 27 tpi Amphenol connector if both parts are accurately machined.
Dean Huster, Electronics Curmudgeon
Contributing Editor emeritus, "Q & A", of the former "Poptronics" magazine (formerly "Popular Electronics" and "Electronics Now" magazines).

R.I.P.

jimandy
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Re: mystery connector?

Post by jimandy » Tue Jun 28, 2005 6:36 am

I figgered I'd get an education on the question. There's one more thing, Dean, that puzzles me. You say it's called an Amphenol connector, yet it's described elsewhere as a Switchcraft connector. Is there a "connection" between these two companies?<p>I was really hoping it had a more esoteric name like the BNC which, I understand, comes from "Bayonet Neil Concilman" or something like that, although I've heard that derivation debated.
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Re: mystery connector?

Post by Enzo » Tue Jun 28, 2005 5:19 pm

A bazillion companies make the 1/4" connectors, and more than one made the mic connector. When someone like AMphenol invents something, it often takes their name. Switchcraft makes them still, while I don't think AMphenol does any longer.<p>Around here we do the same thing with "Cinch" plugs. We call them that regardless of who made them.

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Re: mystery connector?

Post by Dean Huster » Wed Jun 29, 2005 4:18 pm

The name "Amphenol microphone connector" is much the same as calling the familiar XLR balanced line mic connector used in professional PA systems a "Cannon connector". Cannon designed the original XLR connector and the name stuck. We're also stuck with a similar (but not quite the same) bunch of stuff like "Scotch tape", "Kleenex", "Sawzall", "Skilsaw" and other trade names that have turned generic. Xerox is the only trade name that has officially been deemed generic when the subject is the process of xerography vs. a specific Xerox product.<p>No, Amphenol no longer makes the original mic connector while Switchcraft does (hence my Web reference to Switchcraft). There are also a few Asian sources, but the versions they make are machined sloppily and don't fit as well as the Switchcraft version.<p>On "BNC", you have bayonet right, but the rest is goofy. I don't remember the actual term, but it's quite generic and descriptive of the connector rather than the connector's daddy.<p>Dean
Dean Huster, Electronics Curmudgeon
Contributing Editor emeritus, "Q & A", of the former "Poptronics" magazine (formerly "Popular Electronics" and "Electronics Now" magazines).

R.I.P.

rstofer
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Re: mystery connector?

Post by rstofer » Wed Jun 29, 2005 4:55 pm

Amphenol says BNC stands for Bayonet Neill Concelman after the Amphenol engineer that developed the device, Carl Concelman.<p>See http://www.amphenolrf.com/products/bnc.asp

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sofaspud
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Re: mystery connector?

Post by sofaspud » Wed Jun 29, 2005 5:11 pm

I remember in the early 90s that R-E had an article or two exploring the origins of the "BNC" name. I recall that Bayonet "Neill Concelman" or "Naval Connector" were the prime suspects, but I've slept since and could be way off.
Who's that Neill guy anyhow?

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Re: mystery connector?

Post by jimandy » Thu Jun 30, 2005 1:24 pm

Sofaspud, I believe you got the spelling right. What I remember reading (not in RE, but is some dictionary of terms at the library) is that Neill and Concelman were two differente people, those being their last names respectively.<p>And, of course, there was the famous threesome of Uie, Huie, and Fuie (pronounced pfooey) who collaborated on the Ubiquitous UHF connector.
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Re: mystery connector?

Post by Newz2000 » Thu Jun 30, 2005 1:39 pm

<blockquote><font size="1" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">quote:</font><hr>Originally posted by jimandy:
And, of course, there was the famous threesome of Uie, Huie, and Fuie (pronounced pfooey) who collaborated on the Ubiquitous UHF connector.<hr></blockquote><p>You're making that up, right? ...

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