Magnet in conductive media...

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jwax
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Re: Magnet in conductive media...

Post by jwax » Fri Jun 22, 2012 8:21 am

haklesup- Who gets the girl and why? :)

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MrAl
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Re: Magnet in conductive media...

Post by MrAl » Fri Jun 22, 2012 2:13 pm

Hi,

Knowing that there is an electric field tells us that there is not a perfect conduction where everything just plainly shorts out. If everything just plainly shorted out, we wouldnt have real life situation.
The E field might be much smaller but it is still there.

But i dont want to get too far into this. I was merely trying to say that if we do look at it as a zero ohm short then it will appear to be something that does nothing. But if we allow it to be what everything in reality is (some resistance) then we see the pattern of the fields and we know there will be some paths of current that are numerically greater than other paths, such as the current farther from the magnet is smaller than the current near the magnet. But more importantly, currents can exist in various directions because there is some resistance, and that resistance is greater from a test space cube far corner to far corner than from mid side to mid side for example, simply because the resistance is proportional to the distance. This means we'll see currents flowing more so in some directions and not as much in others. So the electric field is working with the magnetic field again and the moving magnetic field produces an electric field.

Another thing to realize is the significance of the electric field level is relative to what we are trying to do. If we are trying to power a city that's different than when we are trying to measure a tiny electric field on either side of a magnet or something. Just the mere presence of an electric field would suggest that there may be a way to use that in some sort of measurement device. A good example of this might be the Hall Effect. It's tiny and wasnt used that much for a long time, but today there are a huge number of devices that incorporate HE devices along with their amplifiers. If we assumed that the voltage across a test sample of some metal material (even a small sample) was zero, then we would never have known the Hall Effect.
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haklesup
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Re: Magnet in conductive media...

Post by haklesup » Tue Jun 26, 2012 12:37 pm

Okay,

The engineer and scientist who kind of think similarly come up with the same formula to get the girl. They both decide they will casually half the distance between her every 2 minutes and eventually they will arrive at her side and say hello. After some time the scientist realizes that he will never actually arrive at the girl due to a flaw in his formula, it is asymptotic. However after 3 moves the engineeer says "close enough" and says Hello leaving the scientist to calculate the error.


Okay, another one

A guy who works for Intel is sitting in a bar in Washington DC. He is chatting with some guys at the bar and they ask where he works and he replies just "Intel" expecting everyone to immedietly recognize his prominant employer. But the guys just stare back quizically and ask "Pentagon, DIA or CIA? which one?"

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MrAl
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Re: Magnet in conductive media...

Post by MrAl » Wed Jun 27, 2012 12:44 pm

haklesup wrote:Okay,

The engineer and scientist who kind of think similarly come up with the same formula to get the girl. They both decide they will casually half the distance between her every 2 minutes and eventually they will arrive at her side and say hello. After some time the scientist realizes that he will never actually arrive at the girl due to a flaw in his formula, it is asymptotic. However after 3 moves the engineeer says "close enough" and says Hello leaving the scientist to calculate the error.


Okay, another one

A guy who works for Intel is sitting in a bar in Washington DC. He is chatting with some guys at the bar and they ask where he works and he replies just "Intel" expecting everyone to immedietly recognize his prominant employer. But the guys just stare back quizically and ask "Pentagon, DIA or CIA? which one?"

Hi,

I think we got a little off topic here, but i cant help but notice that because of the wording in this last one i dont see any ambiguity unless the guys themselves work for intelligence which would mean they have no common sense. The word i am referring to in particular is the word, "where". If they ask "where" you work then if he replies "intel" or "Intel" (they would not know which by word of mouth without inferring some more information from the question itself which they should have known how to do) that can only mean he works at the company called Intel. The other 'intel' is not a place. If they asked "who" do you work for then i think there is some ambiguity because he could have meant either Intel or intel.

"Who" do you work for? Intel or intel.
"Where" do you work? Intel is the only one that makes sense. He cant work "at" an intelligence.

True, the English language isnt used as correctly as this many times though.

BTW, in the first one the scientist would have gotten there also but it would have just taken him longer :smile: but then the gal would have rejected him for being a nerd :smile:
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haklesup
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Re: Magnet in conductive media...

Post by haklesup » Thu Jun 28, 2012 3:30 pm

BTW, in the first one the scientist would have gotten there also but it would have just taken him longer but then the gal would have rejected him for being a nerd

In other tellings, the girl finishes sitting and leaves before the scientist gets there (probably because he is creeply sidling up so close, who knows"

The Intel joke is awkward anyway, it's hard to tell out loud. Who and Where; I doubt those drunk agents made the distinction. (in common spoken english, people butcher grammar a lot worse than I did) It's probably funnier to the agent types than the engineers anyway, that's where I heard it.

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MrAl
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Re: Magnet in conductive media...

Post by MrAl » Sat Jun 30, 2012 12:09 pm

Hi,


Yes the English language isnt used that correctly too many times. If i heard "where' i would have assumed they meant to refer to a 'place', but we could easily change that word to 'who' and then it would make more sense anyway.

"Who do you work for?"

They could have actually said that anyway :smile:
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Externet
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Re: Magnet in conductive media...

Post by Externet » Mon Jul 02, 2012 7:26 pm

Embarrassment... :sad:

When the brain goes dormant and cannot remember my own things. Just found this, from 4 years ago:
http://forum.nutsvolts.com/viewtopic.php?f=45&t=8084
Interesting to compare responses then and now. Am sorry, and thanks.
Miguel
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