Tagged (RFID)

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Newz2000
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Tagged (RFID)

Post by Newz2000 » Mon Feb 13, 2006 11:00 am

So there's a company in the US who is now requiring an implanted RFID tag to gain access to the company's data center. (related slashdot article)

So, the RFID tag is encased in a glass capsule. Why in the world would you use glass? What happens if it's broken?

Also, why RFID? You can read these if you get close enough, and they're only 8 digit keys. And you can duplicate them!

I think someone is just too hasty to get on the bandwagon...

Would you get tagged? What if you could start your car, open your garage and log into your computer quickly and easily by putting your hand or arm close by? Would you want to do that (assuming the RFID shortcomings are addressed)?

Newz2000
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Re: Tagged (RFID)

Post by Newz2000 » Mon Feb 13, 2006 11:10 am

Oh, by the way, I should mention that as someone who reads the Bible avidly, I see no foundation to links between implanted RFID tags and the "mark of the beast" mentioned in the apocalyptic book, Revelation. The Bible clearly describes that the number is calculated out to 666 (aka "man's number"). Maybe someone here can explain a way an RFID tag can possibly calculated to be 666 so that I can promptly start beign concerned.

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Chris Smith
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Re: Tagged (RFID)

Post by Chris Smith » Mon Feb 13, 2006 11:17 am

Glass is inert under the skin, and its probably not very breakable. Animal RFID tags have been implanted for more than 20 years now with out any major problems. Even 5% of the population is alergic to SS, because of the nickle. And Nylon/ Teflon has its problems as well.

As to big brother, well the sheep must have a false way to feel secure, that’s why they hire politicians in the first place.

But the old adage is when you give up a piece of your freedom for [the sense of] security, you get neither. But we seem to be a nation of History flunkies.

Now if we could only sucessfully teach history lessons in our class rooms,... what a thought?

Engineer1138
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Re: Tagged (RFID)

Post by Engineer1138 » Mon Feb 13, 2006 2:13 pm

Answer: it's a marketing trick and from what I can see it's paying off royally for them.
"Your data is secure. The only people who can access the datacenter have surgically implanted tags so we have full traceability of access."

Never mind that there are simpler ways to do this. It's all about marketing: those guys are genius.

thesprocket
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Re: Tagged (RFID)

Post by thesprocket » Sat Feb 18, 2006 5:23 pm

UH? If they can be duplicated, cant you just put the "grain of rice" in you pocket and infiltrate the data center?

Newz2000
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Re: Tagged (RFID)

Post by Newz2000 » Sat Feb 18, 2006 6:45 pm

Yeah, I've done more reading on it and I guess when the people who implemented this found out that RFID tags had allready been "hacked" (i.e. can be duplicated) they were surprised. Anyway, like E1138 mentioned, this is all about marketing... I remember when one big ISP bought an old military installation. They hyped it up real heavily. It doesn't make their place any more secure, but it sure sounds cool.

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haklesup
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Re: Tagged (RFID)

Post by haklesup » Tue Feb 21, 2006 1:12 pm

That print article is in conflict with what I saw on TV, I don't believe even the datacenter employees are in fact required to have it implanted. (only 2 people have access, sounds like too few).

Even if it does not catch on or prooves too easy to hack, that company sure did get a lot of PR and its potential customers might think they are more trustworthy for it.

In other words. A publicity Stunt plain and simple.

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