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Computer Clock

Posted: Tue Jan 21, 2003 11:07 am
by Tommy volts
I pulled a small clock off of an old computer my 9 year old son found in a garbage pile.<p>The clock is about 1/4" wide by 1/2" long, bright metal case and has has 4 pins. It is marked:
TXC 60.000MHZ 850NC 9435.<p>Is there any way I can interact with this component? I would like to get some kind of a pulse or something out of it. Maybe with a 9volt battery and a 555 timer & RC circuit or something? I have a simple AD converor and an oscillicope so I can read any output. The challenge for me is getting some kind of response out of this thing.<p>I have been an electrical experimentor for about 30 years but as you can tell I am still am at a very novice level.<p>I would appreciate any replies. <p>P.S.<p>Thank you to those who responded to my 2 earlier posts on other novice projects, one of which I was able to succeed and the other is still in planning.

Re: Computer Clock

Posted: Tue Jan 21, 2003 12:02 pm
by hlreed
I think you must have found an oscillator rather than a clock. It runs at 60,000 cycles/sec. If you put 5 volts and ground at the pins it should run.
Pin 1 is at the sharp corner.(no connection.) Pin 2 is opposite and is 5 volts. Pin 3 is ground. Pin 4 is output.
Hope that is right.

Re: Computer Clock

Posted: Tue Jan 21, 2003 12:57 pm
by Ron H
I think Harold is correct about it being an oscillator, but it oscillates at 60 million cycles per second, not 60 thousand.<p>You won't be able to see an output from your A/D unless it converts at about 200 million conversions per second or greater, which I doubt. You need a wideband oscilloscope (>100 MHz) to see the output directly.<p>Ron

Re: Computer Clock

Posted: Tue Jan 21, 2003 1:51 pm
by hlreed
Ron you are correct. My old eyes can't see good.
All that can be seen here is a constant frequency and if you run it through an ADC you get 5 volts back. Not very interesting.

Re: Computer Clock

Posted: Tue Jan 21, 2003 3:39 pm
by Edd
Tommy volts:
Well we can see that unit was about of '94 vintage of manufacture. And that would typically need quite a bit of dividing down to get down to the application that U were interested in. They use a common pin out and here is info at this site should you want further info on the unit:
http://www.txc.com.tw/product_02_e.htm
I usually am running into them nowadays in surface mount ceramic encased units.<p>73's de Edd
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