Who makes the best basic compiler for Microchips Microco

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MikeFreeman
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Who makes the best basic compiler for Microchips Microco

Post by MikeFreeman » Sun Jan 02, 2005 7:23 pm

Hey Guys <p>Who makes the best basic (or C if the learning curve is not to steep) compiler for Microchips Microcontrollers?
I am new to programing pics, but have programed in Visual Basic quite a bit so coding isn't new to me. Would like some thing easy to use but powerfull enough to grow with.<p>
Tnx Mike.............

bodgy
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Re: Who makes the best basic compiler for Microchips Microco

Post by bodgy » Mon Jan 03, 2005 12:49 am

OK I like structured basic from -<p>16F series www.xcprod.com
18F series www.midwest-software.com<p>They both are 'c' like in grammar, use proper 'c' type pointers, have little code bloat.<p>See my webpage for some real life 16F code.<p>I have also used Mbasic from BasicMicro. This is a tokenized basic and produces large hex files, but has a very nice IDE and debugging facilities.<p>Colin
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Mike6158
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Re: Who makes the best basic compiler for Microchips Microco

Post by Mike6158 » Mon Jan 03, 2005 6:36 am

I like PIC Basic Pro but I'm no expert by any means. There is a link to CCS compilers in another post. It's a C compiler that "looks nice" but there are some downsides to it from what I've read. C doesn't appear to be too difficult... but then again... I've never coded in C :D<p>[ January 03, 2005: Message edited by: NE5U ]</p>
"If the nucleus of a sodium atom were the size of a golf ball, the outermost electrons would lie 2 miles away. Atoms, like galaxies, are cathedrals of cavernous space. Matter is energy."

LucidGuppy
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Re: Who makes the best basic compiler for Microchips Microco

Post by LucidGuppy » Mon Jan 03, 2005 5:57 pm

I've also used pic basic pro and have enjoyed it. Their manual is very good in my opinion and explains every code word in detail.
Why don't you give yourself a nice big round of applause!

MikeFreeman
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Re: Who makes the best basic compiler for Microchips Microco

Post by MikeFreeman » Mon Jan 03, 2005 9:37 pm

What is the main difference between the series of pics ie pic18 verses pic16 and so on?<p>Has any one used mikroBasic?
here is there home page if you want to take a look
mikroBasic
Mike........<p>[ January 03, 2005: Message edited by: BlownDiode ]</p>

bodgy
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Re: Who makes the best basic compiler for Microchips Microco

Post by bodgy » Mon Jan 03, 2005 10:26 pm

I haven't used Mikrobasic so can't comment, I've looked at their Pascal offering though.<p>The 18F series feature more ram and code space than the 16F series, has extra instructions (assembler level) which make accessing tables and other pointer operations much easier to code as more can be done with one instruction than with the 16F series, they have a built in 8*8 multiplier, the top end ones have more hardware gizzmos, such as the soon to be released USB2.0 and multiple uarts versions.<p>The 'W' (working register or accumalator in other uP's) can be directly addressed and finally banking is less problematical for new bees - hummmm.<p>Having said all that, if using basic, 'C', pascal, java, forth etc all the above should be transparent, in which case it one only need get excited over the extra code and ram space and the extra peripherals on board.<p>In some places the cost of an 18F252 (been supeceeded already) is cheaper than its 16F coumterpart one of the 16F87x parts. That is taking into account the extra features etc.<p>If you were starting to code in assembler then I'd recommend the 18F series with no hesitation.<p>Another basic that has a good reputation is Proton basic. <p>Colin<p>[ January 03, 2005: Message edited by: bodgy ]</p>
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ljbeng
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Re: Who makes the best basic compiler for Microchips Microco

Post by ljbeng » Tue Jan 04, 2005 5:07 am

I love BASIC.<p>I used to fear C.<p>Until I tried C. If you know BASIC, you can do wonders with C. I was amazed a how similar the two languages were. I taught myself C in about a week and I haven't used BASIC or Assembly since.<p>With that said, www.ccsinfo.com makes a good C compiler for Microchip. I have had great luck and there is a good forum for posting questions. I use mostly the 18F chips now since they are optimized for C programming and have more memory than the 16F units. These chips are mostly pin-for-pin compatible between 16F and 18F.

MikeFreeman
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Re: Who makes the best basic compiler for Microchips Microco

Post by MikeFreeman » Wed Jan 05, 2005 8:04 am

I see Microchip makes the PicStart plus and a couple of other programers.<p>What hardware is need to program these pics?<p>Are the programers universal between the different software packages?<p>
Mike................

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philba
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Re: Who makes the best basic compiler for Microchips Microco

Post by philba » Wed Jan 05, 2005 8:24 am

I'm not sure of your question. Pic Start is a programmer - it will program <most> PICs. <p>If you are asking about how to design a PIC programmer, the data sheets are a good place to start as well as numerous microchip apnotes. In addition there are many many circuit diagrams for programmers out there that you can look at and learn from.<p>No, the programmer software does not work with every programmer. MPLAB works with picstart and other microchip programmers. some 3rd party programmers also work with MPLAB but tend to be pricey. There are several other programs that work with a range of programmers (pony prog springs to mind). Look at this sparkfun page for just a sampling - http://www.sparkfun.com/shop/index.php? ... 7089&cat=3&<p>Phil

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