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Re: Experimenting with Hot Glue..

Posted: Fri Jun 22, 2018 2:53 pm
by evahle
Experimenting with hot glue and silicone:

Image

Re: Experimenting with Hot Glue..

Posted: Fri Jun 22, 2018 2:55 pm
by evahle
Conclusion:

Image

Re: Experimenting with Hot Glue..

Posted: Fri Jun 22, 2018 3:16 pm
by dyarker
The silicone contains acid (did you notice vinegar like smell?) and attacked the solder the fastest. My guess would be the tin in the solder before the lead. (maybe some chemistry person can say). Yes monitor for slower corrosion.

Which little bit were you missing in making images work?

Cheers,

Re: Experimenting with Hot Glue..

Posted: Fri Jun 22, 2018 6:39 pm
by CeaSaR
Good to see you've gotten the hang of it. Though I would caution you against using Wikimedia as an image hosting site without creating an article to go with the images. They may see that as misuse and rescind your membership and wipe your photos from the site. That is why I was suggesting a dedicated image host such as PostImage or Imgur or some other similar site.

I had seen you had tried to use PostImage before, but the picture had dissappeared. If you join up, you get to put your images in "your own" folder(s) where they will stay until you remove them. All the ones I have in my area are still there. The ones I inadvertently uploaded to the common area (non-login area) are gone.

Just trying to look out for a fellow enthusiast.

CeaSaR

Re: Experimenting with Hot Glue..

Posted: Fri Jun 22, 2018 6:50 pm
by evahle
Thanks guys. Dyarker, with Ceasar's help I managed to get the image in where it belonged. I first tried to copy and paste the link into the text area. Anyway, I hope I can remember the next time. Lol.
Ceasar, actually I like the idea of making the projects I make educational, so I guess I'll have to be sure to write up something each time before uploading pictures. I'm going to do that here anyway. Thank you so much for helping me out with that, it was rough, but I got it done (dog with a bone). Lol!
:)

Re: Experimenting with Hot Glue..

Posted: Fri Jun 22, 2018 8:53 pm
by CeaSaR
Any time!

It's good to see life here again. And I think that's a noble effort on your part for the greater masses.

Have a great weekend!

Re: Experimenting with Hot Glue..

Posted: Sat Jun 23, 2018 8:17 pm
by MrAl
evahle wrote:
Fri Jun 22, 2018 2:55 pm
Conclusion:

Image
Hi,

Very interesting experiment. I dont see the pictures though, is there a place i can go to see them too?

Re: Experimenting with Hot Glue..

Posted: Sat Jun 23, 2018 8:29 pm
by evahle
Mr AL, I now have them on here. They're on pages 6 and 7.

Re: Experimenting with Hot Glue..

Posted: Sun Jun 24, 2018 6:05 am
by CeaSaR
MrAl,
Can you see a site called Wikimedia.org? If so, these pics should show up in evahle's posts at the bottom and top of the last page and this page, respectively.

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/ ... iment1.jpg
https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/ ... iment2.jpg
https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/ ... lusion.jpg

CeaSaR

Re: Experimenting with Hot Glue..

Posted: Mon Jun 25, 2018 1:26 pm
by MrAl
Hi again,

Oh yes very nice, thanks.
It's good to look at stuff like this for future use. Waterproofing is often in great need for electronic devices.

Re: Experimenting with Hot Glue..

Posted: Tue Jun 26, 2018 10:45 am
by haklesup
I wonder if the Silicone II would have worked better. In any case, there are spray on Silicone conformal coating products if you really needed that kind of protection. In most cases a urethane conformal coat is sufficient and is removable with acetone. Most modern parts can survive acetone but I wouldn't clean old assemblies with it.

I assume the corrosion wasn't due to residual uncleaned flux since the copper looked OK.

I have almost never found hot glue to be a reliable long term solution. more of a MacGyver solution usually

Re: Experimenting with Hot Glue..

Posted: Tue Jun 26, 2018 11:53 am
by evahle
Yup, that's me. MacGyver!! Lol!

Re: Experimenting with Hot Glue..

Posted: Mon Sep 10, 2018 7:24 pm
by Lenp
I use Permatex windshield silicone sealer. It is flowable and levels nicely. I have used it for years for some potting applications and never experienced corrosion issues. Most silicones require humidy to cure so exposed surfaces cure first then it gradually cures deeper and heat will not accelerate the curing. Ultimately all slilcones will cure, even in their tubes as we all know. For a a deep application do it in layers letting each cure seperately. Potting componds, made for deep applications do not need the moisture to cure.

Side notes:
JB Weld, in spite of it's name, contains no metal or conductive materials. Recently I used it to insulate a portion of a burned brush holder in an industrial 200+VDC motor. The megger didn't even quiver at 500V. The big tubes are my go-to for many projects, including filling holes in sheet metal panels.

Don't think the hobby shop stick hot glue is all there is. There is a wide variety of hot glues (thermo adhesives) used in many industries. I get a handfull of chips from a bindery I support. One chip and a touch from an old school woodburnng pen, seals a pot adjustment, sticks a flying wire to a board or helps shakeproof a fastener or reinforse small wires on a soldered connection. It also works well to temporarly hold something in place while better products, like epoxy, cures.

Are we having fun yet!

Re: Experimenting with Hot Glue..

Posted: Tue Sep 11, 2018 8:19 am
by MrAl
Hi Len,

I use JB Weld too and have for years now.
It came in really handy some years back when i had to repair an exhaust valve because there were no more made for that car and i had to get through inspection. It did not see the full heat of the exhaust manifold, but was nonetheless under the hood with all that hot stuff and yet it survived for several years.
I used the regular JB Weld for that, but i have used the JB Quik too and that's not bad either, for more regular repairs. I had to enclose a current meter with plexiglass one time because the bezel broke up one day, and it worked pretty well. It cures much quicker than JB Weld, but does not handle as high a temperature.