Can someone tell me how to run this motor?

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Is this anough info?

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compwiz575
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Can someone tell me how to run this motor?

Post by compwiz575 » Fri Jun 09, 2006 2:50 pm

Hi i just got a bunch of Litton/Clifton Precision motors. I think they are spindle motors but i"m not sure.
Can you tell me how to run this motor? or where to find the specs?

On the conector it says
Customer part Number:
1000-010-00
B0S-1648-3A-C
Date Code: 8605R
Serial NO: 452399

also on the motor it says:
MFR 86197
Made in USA

Please tell me every thing you know about this motor

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rshayes
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Post by rshayes » Sat Jun 10, 2006 4:19 am

The Clifton Precision division of Litton Industries appears to have been sold to Moog Components Group in 1992.

The date code is 8605, which would indicate that the motor was manufactured in May of 1986.

"MFR 86197" may be the 5 digit vendor code used by the US government to identify vendors of various products.

The number of connections would probably indicate a brushless DC motor, with connections for both drive coils and hall-effect position sensors. The brushless motors presently offered by Moog Components use a three phase drive with three hall-effect sensors with a total of 8 connections. This motor appears to be similar, but with nine connections brought out. A few resistance measurements with a digital multimeter may identify which connections are the drive coils. Look for low resistances (probably below 1K) that read the same when the probe polarity is reversed. The drive coils will probably share a common terminal.

Turning the rotor by hand without power will probably generate an AC voltage on the drive coils with no output on the hall sensors.

I would expect that the drive coils would have 4 connections ( 1 common and 3 separate phases). The hall sensors might use 5 connections (1 power, 1 ground, and 3 outputs).

From the size, I would guess that these were used in a full height, 5 1/4 inch hard drive. This would be consistent with the date code. It may have been a custom design for a particular manufacturer. The technical department at Moog might have old drawings or data on the part, but don't count on that too heavily.

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compwiz575
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Post by compwiz575 » Mon Jun 12, 2006 6:20 pm

Im new at this so can you tell me what a hall effect sensor is

nvm

SirRah
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These servos

Post by SirRah » Thu Sep 28, 2006 11:46 pm

I too have a quantity of these servos. If it is for a HDD it is a dang big HDD. I have dealt in PC era for many years and never seen a disk drive motor of this size, though it might be something odd as there are several indications this part is used for something military in nature. Due to the shaft dimensions it is an odd duck.

I have a number of original motors in original bags. I find it interesting that our parts were built the same month of 86 must have been a serious overstock. I have a contract number that I believe relates to the PADS (Position Azimuth Determining System)used by the DOD but not 100% on that, I have to try to cross PN. If it is the item in question the sub assy was never assigned an NSN as it was a factory replacement part only (there was an NSN on the Gimbal assy but not on the drive motors). I suspect they are the gimbal motors that were used to sense gyro motion.
This was a Litton system in the timeframe of mfg. This may make getting spec information a bit difficult, however I may be able to find operation pinout perameters. I will post what I can find.

A starting point on hall effect:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hall_effect

I will post the operating voltages for these motors once I find the information.

SirRah
I came, I saw, I broke it

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compwiz575
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Post by compwiz575 » Tue Oct 03, 2006 8:28 am

That would be a big help hope to here from you soon

motor-gypsy
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Post by motor-gypsy » Sun Apr 22, 2007 4:04 pm

Did you ever receive any information on these? I was on the team that developed them in the early 80's. It was revolutionary at the time, with the motor located inside the hub. It is three-phase, four-pole and wye-connected. I have wiring information somewhere if you still need it. I wouldn't mind having one of these myself. Let me know.

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