Learning about Robotics

Interested in Robotics? Here's the place to be.
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Michael-love-electronics
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Learning about Robotics

Post by Michael-love-electronics » Fri Apr 02, 2004 3:19 pm

Hi Everyone,....<p> Does anyone can guide me to the simplest website or textbook where I can start learning about robotics.?????? :D <p>I'm interesting in ROBOCON competition and I want to paticipate, So I want to learn everything for the beginning............ :D <p> Thanks for your help and consideration

Tommy volts
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Re: Learning about Robotics

Post by Tommy volts » Mon Apr 12, 2004 10:56 am

Michael,<p>A good way to get started in robotics is to get a Boe-Bot from Paralax (they are also sold at retail stores like where I got mine at Frys Electronics).<p>It comes with all of the parts you need and a couple of great books that walk you through all of the steps. It uses the Basic Stamp II micro controller which is very easy to use and program.<p>It is by large the easiest and least expensive way to get started in robotics.<p>By the time you go through all of the examples in the books you will be ready to make the transition to combat robots. <p>Good luck!

Michael-love-electronics
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Re: Learning about Robotics

Post by Michael-love-electronics » Fri Apr 23, 2004 10:38 pm

Thanks very much Tommy Volts,... :) <p> But, What other good books can I get to start, in case I ciuldn't find this kit.??????

Daggs
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Re: Learning about Robotics

Post by Daggs » Thu Apr 29, 2004 7:16 am

This site has the Boe-Bot kit...http://www.parallax.com/html_pages/robo ... .asp<p>Use the Nuts and Volts homepage and check out the on-line store. Many robotics books.
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Tommy volts
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Re: Learning about Robotics

Post by Tommy volts » Wed Jun 16, 2004 10:54 am

Michael,<p>I am using this post to respond to your other post this morning (June 16, 2004)regarding your interest in getting started in microcontrollers:<p>Have you gotten started in robotics yet? Did you go for the Boe-Bot? If so, then the Parallax microcontrollers/programmers/compilers are the way to go. You can transfer all your knowledge over.<p>If not, then you may want to go with a $17 kit that Carl's Electronics sells: it has the PIC, the programmer, the assembler, the turorial, and a bunch of programs already to run. It is hands down the cheapest and easiest way into microcontrolling. it also gives you the link to the free download of MPASM which is a fantastic assembler, very easy to use with a great debug program.

Will
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Re: Learning about Robotics

Post by Will » Thu Jun 17, 2004 12:43 pm

TV - The $17 kit from Carl's Electronics sounds like a winner - I managed to find Carl's on the Internet but couldn't identify the kit - Was it the Programmer kit at $17.95 ? - If not I would be grateful if you could put up the kit part number
BB

Tommy volts
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Re: Learning about Robotics

Post by Tommy volts » Mon Jun 21, 2004 7:53 am

Will,<p>It is the $17.95 kit (see link below). Have fun, it's a great kit!!<p>Microcontroller Kit

Will
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Re: Learning about Robotics

Post by Will » Tue Jun 22, 2004 6:38 pm

Thanks TV - Have ordered one - will look forward to playing with it - Whhat I actually want to do is to sophisticate my battery charger - I recently put a new 20 amp rectifier in it then blew it up by trying to charge a friend's pick-up truck battery when it was absolutely dead - So, before I put another one in there I am going to investigate putting some protection on the charger i.e. current limits, measure transformer and rectifier temperatures etc and use those readings to either cut off or limit the output of the charger. I once, many years ago, used a 555 to sophisticate a battery charger - I set the 555 to 30 minutes charge and ten minutes discharge times and then connected the (Potentiometer reduced) battery volts to the op amp input (Pin 2 ) of the 555 and then rigged the whole thing uip with a little logic so that when the inout sensed a battery of volts of just below supercharge (About 12.4 volts 9f I remember) so that when the 555 snesed the volts below 12.4 it turned the charger on for ten minutes then it turned it off again, waited 30 secs then sampled the volts again, if V was not below 12.4 then it put the 555 into the 30 minute cycle before sampling the volts again. The net result was that the device sampled the volts every 30 minutes and only turned the charger on for the ten minute cycle when low volts was sensed. That all meant that the battery was never over charged and consequently no dangerous discharges of H2 and O2 were generated - It worked Ok but I think it might not have taken care of the fried rectifier problem
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